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Dorset Visual Arts,
Little Keep, Bridport Road,
Dorchester, Dorset

DT1 1SQ

Phone
 
01305 853100

LIZ SOMERVILLE

About Liz Somerville

For artist website please follow link

 

"Living in Dorset, landscape is a central theme and the winter the best time to see it; plough and livestock tracks, oddly shaped fields and quirky colour.

I like flow, lyricism and mark making. I don’t have a press, as I like to work large, so I use a wooden spoon instead. It works very well and gives me the freedom to work at more or less whatever scale I want to. I use paint instead of printed blocks of colour, for the same reason. "

CONTACT

 

Studio: Old School House, Ryme Intrinseca, Sherborne, Dorset DT9 6JX

 

Email: info@lizsomerville.co.uk

 

Number: 07971 871117

I was born in Dorset but brought up in a remote village surrounded by sweet chestnut woods on the North Downs in Kent. I did my art foundation year at Canterbury College of Art and a degree in textile design at Winchester School of Art. After graduating in 1988 I spent 11 years in London doing a variety of design and art-related jobs, including printed fabric design, gallery management, and marketing and graphics for a structural engineering consultancy. For five years, alongside these various jobs, I rented a space in a shared studio in Hoxton Square, Shoreditch, where I continued to design for printed fabric and developed my printmaking and painting.

In 2004 I returned to Dorset to be a full-time artist. Printmaking has always been a love of mine. I’ve played with lots of different techniques and relief printing, linocuts and woodcuts combined with painted blocks of colour, is, for me, the most satisfactory method. Living in Dorset, landscape is a central theme and the winter the best time to see it; plough and livestock tracks, oddly shaped fields and quirky colour.

I like flow, lyricism and mark making. I don’t have a press, as I like to work large, so I use a wooden spoon instead. It works very well and gives me the freedom to work at more or less whatever scale I want to. I use paint instead of printed blocks of colour, for the same reason. The upshot of this is that each piece is unique; eventually, over a period of years, up to 15 (sometimes 20) versions of each piece is made, instead of a numbered edition. These techniques are very much a means to an end; the overall effect is what I’m after, I’m no slave to convention.

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Liz Tyler  >

Jewellery